Delaware House panel approves marijuana legalization bill

DOVER, Del. – (AP) – A bill legalizing the recreational use of marijuana in Delaware has cleared its first legislative hurdle.

The legislation, which was released Wednesday by a House committee and now goes to the full House for a vote, regulates and taxes marijuana in the same manner as alcohol.

The bill doesn’t allow people to grow their own marijuana but allows adults over age 21 to legally possess less than an ounce of marijuana for personal use.

The legislation would create a commission to regulate, license and tax the marijuana industry, allowing licenses for up to 40 retail stores.

Consumers would pay an excise tax of $50 an ounce, while businesses would pay an application fee of $5,000 and a $10,000 licensing fee every two years.

Congress Hands A Mixed Bag to Marijuana Movement

The year-end spending bill gives momentum to the marijuana movement, plus a painful setback

For the marijuana legalization movement, 2014 ends the way it began: with legal changes that showcase the movement’s momentum alongside its problems.

Tucked into the 1,603-page year-end spending bill Congress released Tuesday night were a pair of provisions that affect proponents of cannabis reform. Together they form a metaphor for the politics of legal cannabis—an issue that made major bipartisan strides this year, but whose progress is hampered by a tangle of local, state and federal statutes that have sown confusion and produced contradictory justice.

First the good news for reformers: the proposed budget would prohibit law enforcement officials from using federal funds to prosecute patients or legal dispensaries in the 32 states, plus the District of Columbia, that passed some form of medical-marijuana legalization. The provision was crafted by a bipartisan group of representatives and passed the Republican-controlled House in May for the first time in seven tries. If passed into law, it would mark a milestone for the movement, restricting raids against dispensaries and inoculating patients from being punished for an activity that is legal where they live but in violation of federal law.

“The enactment of this legislation will mark the first time in decades that the federal government has curtailed its oppressive prohibition of marijuana, and has instead taken an approach to respect the many states that have permitted the use of medical marijuana to some degree,” Rep. Dana Rohrabacher said in a statement to TIME. The California Republican’s work on the issue reflects the strange coalition that has sprung up to support cannabis reform as the GOP’s libertarian wing gains steam and voters’ views evolve.

At the same time, the House chose to overrule Washington, D.C., on the issue. Last month voters in the District chose to liberalize its marijuana laws, passing an initiative that legalized the possession, consumption and cultivation of recreational marijuana. The move, which was supported by about 70% of the capital’s voters, paved the way for D.C. to follow in the footsteps of Colorado and Washington State by establishing a tax-and-regulatory structure for cannabis sales in 2015.

Source

Missouri lawmakers working to legalize cannabis extract

JEFFERSON CITY — Although Missouri lawmakers are not clamoring to legalize marijuana, key Republican lawmakers appear ready to follow a few states in allowing use of a cannabis extract for people whose epilepsy isn’t relieved by other treatments.

Legislation is advancing in the Missouri House, where a committee could hold a public hearing and vote this week. Recently filed legislation is backed by the Republican House speaker, majority leader and Democratic leaders. It also is supported by a Republican senator whose son has epilepsy. Sponsoring Rep. Caleb Jones said lawmakers are moving quickly.

“People realize that people’s lives are at stake,” said Jones, R-Columbia.

About a dozen states have considered legislation seeking to allow use of cannabidiol oil for patients who have seizures. Cannabidiol, also called CBD, is a compound in cannabis but doesn’t cause users to feel high. During the past week, the South Carolina House approved a bill and Wisconsin lawmakers sent a measure to Gov. Scott Walker. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley signed legislation allowing the University of Alabama at Birmingham to study the marijuana extract while giving participants legal protection from state criminal charges.

There has been particular attention on oil from the marijuana strain Charlotte’s Web bred for an epileptic patient in Colorado. It is high in CBD and has little or no psychoactive effects. There is a waiting list, and patients must live in Colorado where marijuana is legal.

The Marijuana Policy Project said CBD oil is relatively new. The Washington-based advocacy group doesn’t oppose the state efforts but says there are other health problems for which cannabis also can help.

“It’s an easy sort of rallying point, but the problem is that it leaves behind the vast majority of patients who would otherwise benefit from medical marijuana,” said Chris Lindsey, legislative analyst for the group.

Missouri’s legislation would allow use of “hemp extract” with no more than 0.3 percen tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, and at least 5 percent CBD. Patients or their parents would need a registration card, and it only could be used for epilepsy that a neurologist has determined isn’t responding to at least three treatment options. The state Agriculture Department could grow plants, and universities could be certified to cultivate them for research.

“This is one to me that is kind of a no-brainer,” said Sen. Eric Schmitt, R-St. Louis County. “You can’t get high on it. It can help some families.”

Schmitt’s 9-year-old son, Stephen, has intractable epilepsy and daily seizures. Infantile spasms started when Stephen was about 9 months old and his first big seizure came when he was a little older than 1. Medications have helped but not stopped them.

Schmitt said he is uncertain whether CBD oil is an option but that families should have access if it can provide relief to people going through dozens or hundreds of seizures daily.

One Missouri family looking for relief for a sick child is heading to Colorado to find it.

June Jessee turns 2 years old later this month. Her parents, Matt and Genny Jessee, said they have tried everything they can legally to stop seizures that they estimate occur at least 20 times daily. June has taken 10 seizure medications, adopted a special diet, tried alternative therapies like chiropractic care and seen a homeopathic doctor. She also has other health problems, but it is unknown how they are connected.

Doctors suggested retrying medicine that already failed to stop the seizures, and the family instead is moving. Matt Jessee is a lobbyist at Bryan Cave in St. Louis.

Genny Jessee said CBD oil isn’t guaranteed to work but likened it to trying other medications or treatments. She said it doesn’t make sense families go through so many hoops for something that could prove lifesaving.

Missouri’s bill sponsor got to know Matt Jessee when they both worked on President George W. Bush’s 2004 campaign and stood next to him at Matt’s wedding.

Even if Missouri lawmakers legalize CBD oil quickly, it will not stop the Jessee family from going to Colorado. But they hope it could allow them to return to Missouri.

Read more here

New Hampshire – vote postponed

As New Hampshire lawmakers convened for the 2014 legislative session, as we had discussed on our MMJNEWS page on Instagram there was to be a debate and a vote on a bill to legalize and regulate marijuana in New Hampshire…. Unfortunately, this was delayed until next week as lawmakers did not have enough time to cover this specific issue, but did promise it will be revisited…

Found this photo on twitter of volunteers and enthusiasts and it truly touched my heart!!!! They so deserve this!!!

Link to full details of the initiative here

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New Hampshire legalizes medical marijuana-MMJNEWS

New Hampshire legalized medical marijuana today.. However, PTSD was removed from the list of qualifying ailments.
Below from MPP.ORG
“The qualifying conditions are cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, ALS, muscular dystrophy, Crohn’s disease, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, chronic pancreatitis, spinal cord injury or disease, traumatic brain injury, and injuries that significantly interfere with daily activities.

The qualifying symptoms are severely debilitating or terminal medical conditions or their treatments that have produced elevated intraocular pressure, cachexia, chemotherapy-induced anorexia, wasting syndrome, severe pain if it has not responded to other treatments or if treatments produced serious side effects, severe nausea, vomiting, seizures, or severe, persistent muscle spasms.”
HB573 has been a difficult one to get signed into law, and patients will still have to wait until 2015 for dispensaries to open. But this is a very crucial step for medical marijuana patients that are in need on the east coast.