Arkansas Update! Get ready residents !

 

By TAFI MUKUNYADZI, Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas’ medical marijuana industry will ramp up in the next week, with the state poised to accept applications from potential patients, growers and distributors.

Beginning Friday, the state Medical Marijuana Commission will accept applications from those hoping to grow or supply marijuana, while the Health Department will take applications from those hoping to benefit from the first marijuana-as-medicine program in the Bible Belt. The application periods will run until Sept. 18.

State officials expect anywhere from 20,000 to 40,000 people to seek permission to use the drug for a number of health problems. It will cost $50 to apply and permits must be renewed yearly.

Potential patients must submit written certification from a physician to obtain a registration card, demonstrating that the doctor has fully assessed the patient’s medical history. The application must show that there’s an established physician-patient relationship and that the patient has a certain qualifying medical condition.

All applicants must have a driver’s license or state-issued ID card, and those under age 18 need the consent of a parent or guardian to apply.

Family Council president Jerry Cox, who opposed the medical marijuana plan, fears that some may try to “game” the system and obtain marijuana even if they don’t have one of the 18 medical conditions listed in the law. The health issues include intractable pain, cancer, glaucoma, a positive HIV/AIDS status, hepatitis C, Tourette’s syndrome, Crohn’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder and severe nausea.

Cox said intractable pain and severe nausea are conditions that are difficult to medically prove and that doctors have to take patients at their word when recommending them for medical marijuana. He said that state lawmakers could’ve placed more restrictions on medical marijuana, like blanket bans on edibles and smoking.

Vermont legislature approves recreational marijuana use

A measure legalizing marijuana use in Vermont cleared the state’s legislature on Wednesday.

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott (R) has said the legislation is not “a priority for Vermont” and has not made a final decision as to whether he will sign it. The measure makes Vermont the ninth state to legalize recreational marijuana use among adults and the first to legalize through a legislative process. Other states have approved recreational marijuana use through ballot initiatives.

“Vermont lawmakers made history today,” said Matt Simon, the New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project, a marijuana policy group. “The legislature has taken a crucial step toward ending the failed policy of marijuana prohibition.” Eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized the possession and use of marijuana, though each state has its own rules and regulations. For example, in Washington — one of the first states to legalize pot — only individuals using the drug for medical purposes can grow it, though any adult is allowed to possess and use it.

In Washington, D.C., marijuana can be used and “gifted,” but not bought, sold or exchanged for other goods or services.

Marijuana use is illegal according to federal policy, and President Trump’s opposition to legalization has created uncertainty for some states seeking to regulate the industry.

If signed by the governor, the Vermont measure would remove civil penalties for possessing one ounce of marijuana or less and would allow adults to keep up to two mature pot plants. It would also create a commission to develop a plan for taxing and regulating the drug.

Santa Ana – Dispensary Applications are now being accepted!

Today, officials for the City of Santa Ana began accepting applications from people interested in opening up medical marijuana shops.

Measure BB, which voters approved, allows for the legal sale of medical cannabis in Orange County.

Santa Ana was the first city to accept these applications in Orange County and they will be available for the next 30 days.

The applications will be screened for a period of time, before about 12 or so will be selected to open for business. It has been reported that more than 75 people lined up at City Hall to apply for licenses today, and in the coming days dozens more are expected.

“The voters passed this overwhelmingly with 75 percent approval,” said Vincent Sarmiento, Santa Ana Mayor pro tem. “Many of those voters have family members, or themselves, who are suffering with illnesses and hope that medicinal marijuana will be able to give some relief to them.”

The rules about where the collectives can operate are strict.

They will be zoned and regulated to operate in the southern and eastern parts of the city. The collectives must also be at least 1,000 feet from parks, schools and residential areas, similar to rules in Riverside County.

FOR MEASURE BB TEXT CLICK HERE

Congress Hands A Mixed Bag to Marijuana Movement

The year-end spending bill gives momentum to the marijuana movement, plus a painful setback

For the marijuana legalization movement, 2014 ends the way it began: with legal changes that showcase the movement’s momentum alongside its problems.

Tucked into the 1,603-page year-end spending bill Congress released Tuesday night were a pair of provisions that affect proponents of cannabis reform. Together they form a metaphor for the politics of legal cannabis—an issue that made major bipartisan strides this year, but whose progress is hampered by a tangle of local, state and federal statutes that have sown confusion and produced contradictory justice.

First the good news for reformers: the proposed budget would prohibit law enforcement officials from using federal funds to prosecute patients or legal dispensaries in the 32 states, plus the District of Columbia, that passed some form of medical-marijuana legalization. The provision was crafted by a bipartisan group of representatives and passed the Republican-controlled House in May for the first time in seven tries. If passed into law, it would mark a milestone for the movement, restricting raids against dispensaries and inoculating patients from being punished for an activity that is legal where they live but in violation of federal law.

“The enactment of this legislation will mark the first time in decades that the federal government has curtailed its oppressive prohibition of marijuana, and has instead taken an approach to respect the many states that have permitted the use of medical marijuana to some degree,” Rep. Dana Rohrabacher said in a statement to TIME. The California Republican’s work on the issue reflects the strange coalition that has sprung up to support cannabis reform as the GOP’s libertarian wing gains steam and voters’ views evolve.

At the same time, the House chose to overrule Washington, D.C., on the issue. Last month voters in the District chose to liberalize its marijuana laws, passing an initiative that legalized the possession, consumption and cultivation of recreational marijuana. The move, which was supported by about 70% of the capital’s voters, paved the way for D.C. to follow in the footsteps of Colorado and Washington State by establishing a tax-and-regulatory structure for cannabis sales in 2015.

Source

Little Rock, Arkansas – MMJNEWS

LITTLE ROCK — Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel has rejected the wording of a proposal to legalize medical marijuana by a group that is trying to put the measure before voters in 2016.

McDaniel’s office on Monday rejected the wording of the proposal by Arkansans for Compassionate Care, which had tried unsuccessfully to get medical marijuana legalization on this year’s ballot.

The group had been unable to gather the 62,507 signatures from registered voters needed by the July 7 deadline to submit petitions to qualify for the November ballot.
The group is now trying to put the legalization measure on the 2016 ballot. McDaniel cited ambiguities in the text of the latest measure in rejecting its wording.

The proposal would allow patients with qualifying conditions to buy marijuana from nonprofit dispensaries.

MMJnews , for Arkansas?!

By Ed Krayewski

After a history of rejecting marijuana-related ballot measures at the certify-the-popular-name-and-ballot-title step of the process, Arkansas’ attorney general, Democrat Dusin McDaniel, is allowing the Arkansas Hemp and Cannabis Amendment to move forward.

Supporters of the measure now have until July 7 to file the necessary petition signatures—78,133 of them. They have to hit a specified minimum number of signatures in 15 of the seventy five counties in Arkansas. The amendment was proposed by Robert Reed, whose medical marijuana amendment was rejected earlier this year at the same point in the process.

Arkansas has among the harshest marijuana laws in the country, according to the Marijuana Policy Project. Possession of up to four ounces can lead to a year in jail, and a third possession conviction can lead to six.

Text of the amendment below:

Section 1. This is an Amendment to the Arkansas Constitution that shall be called “The Arkansas Hemp and Cannabis Amendment.”

Section 2. Effective April 20, 2015, the cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, selling, possessing and use of the cannabis plant (genus cannabis) and all products derived from the cannabis plant (genus cannabis) is lawful within the entire geographic area of each and every county of this State.

Section 3. “Hemp” is defined for purposes of this amendment as any part of the cannabis plant (genus cannabis), living or not, containing one percent or less, by dry weight, Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol(Delta-9-THC).

Section 4. “Cannabis” is defined for purposes of this amendment as any part of the cannabis plant (genus cannabis), living or not, containing greater than one percent, by dry weight, Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC).

Section 5. The cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, sale, possession and use of “Hemp” for personal, industrial, or commercial use may be regulated, but the number of plants cultivated or the products derived from manufacturing, shall not [be] limited or prohibited, by the General Assembly.

Section 6. The cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, sale, possession and use of “Cannabis” for personal, industrial, or commercial use may be regulated, but not prohibited, by the General Assembly.

Section 7. All laws which conflict with this amendment are hereby repealed to the extent that they conflict with this amendment.